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Vintage Anatolian Kirsehir Rug inspired by the Transylvanian Style 3.5x5.2ft
Vintage Anatolian Kirsehir Rug inspired by the Transylvanian Style 3.5x5.2ft
Vintage Anatolian Kirsehir Rug inspired by the Transylvanian Style 3.5x5.2ft
Vintage Anatolian Kirsehir Rug inspired by the Transylvanian Style 3.5x5.2ft
Vintage Anatolian Kirsehir Rug inspired by the Transylvanian Style 3.5x5.2ft
Vintage Anatolian Kirsehir Rug inspired by the Transylvanian Style 3.5x5.2ft
Vintage Anatolian Kirsehir Rug inspired by the Transylvanian Style 3.5x5.2ft
Vintage Anatolian Kirsehir Rug inspired by the Transylvanian Style 3.5x5.2ft
Vintage Anatolian Kirsehir Rug inspired by the Transylvanian Style 3.5x5.2ft
Vintage Anatolian Kirsehir Rug inspired by the Transylvanian Style 3.5x5.2ft

Vintage Anatolian Kirsehir Rug inspired by the Transylvanian Style 3.5x5.2ft


1970s Faded Anatolian Turkish Rug 

These type of Anatolian rugs are most of the time from the 70s and 80s(unless otherwise specified). They are hand dyed with a mixture of artificial dyes and natural dyes. Our products are hand woven %100 Wool on Wool or Wool on Cotton unless otherwise specified (hemp goat hair camel hair)

All naturally dyed with roots and other plants unless otherwise specified(artificial dyes).

Dimensions: 3.5ft x 5.2ft

Origin: Anatolia Turkey

All our products are cleaned and repaired by professionals.

Please view our Store Policy for detailed information.

Contact us with product questions prior to purchase.

*Info about Transylvanian Carpets*

Carpets called “Siebenburgen” or “Transylvanian are those which have been found in the Protestan churches of Siebenburgen. Some of them carry a label on the back stating where when and by whom the piece has been donated to the church. Sieberburgen/Transylvanian is an area between the South and the East Carpathian and West Siebenburgen mountains in Romania. In 1541 the area came under rule of the Ottoman Empire and became a Turkish protectorate of the principality of Transylnia. Legend has it that Suleiman ‘the magnificient’ sent his vizier with the gift of a beautiful carpet to the Black Church in Kronstadt(Brasov) as proof of his friendly disposition and respect for the Christian religion. Apparently the patriarch was over-joyed and ordered 2 000 of the beautiful pieces as decoration for his churches. The use of carpets did not remain for long the domain of religion; soon the merchants discovered the new market for the Anatolian carpet and a flourishing trade developed.